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Maritime Makers Market a big draw for Mahone Bay

Last year’s Maritime Makers Market saw 75 vendors take up residence in Mahone Bay. This year, over 80 vendors from across Atlantic Canada are scheduled to participate.
Last year’s Maritime Makers Market saw 75 vendors take up residence in Mahone Bay. This year, over 80 vendors from across Atlantic Canada are scheduled to participate. - Contributed

The crafting hordes — ranging from card makers to jewellers — are set to descend on Mahone Bay.

And according to Jessika Hepburn, the Maritime Makers Spring Market on May 25 will showcase the best of Nova Scotia’s creative community.

“The wide variety of talent we have in our province really blows my mind,” said Hepburn, one of the organizers and a co-owner of the Biscuit Eater Café.

Over 80 makers of handmade goods are scheduled to participate, setting up in 10 different locations across town.

Hepburn said the market is an unparalleled draw to the area; over 5,000 people visited last year’s event.

“We get really busy in the summer but there’s a whole other level of people coming out specifically because they care about local, creative entrepreneurs.

“This Mahone Bay event is particularly amazing because we’re pulling people from all four Atlantic provinces to a tiny rural town.”

Venues will each have a loose theme.

For example, the Biscuit Eater will house local foods and creative goods, while the Dog Shop will house pet-themed crafts and treats.

Hepburn added this year may be the most diverse of the Maritime Makers’ events given the range of artisans.

She pointed to the Kitch’Inn venue, which has makers from all four Atlantic provinces, as a sign of the region’s growing industry.

“What we’re really looking for is the best representation of our creative economy,” she said.

In fact, the market is also a great opportunity for vendors to connect.

Jeweller and goldsmith Dorothée Rosen said the market offers a chance to get out and interact with the maker community and customers.

“When I do markets like the one in Mahone Bay, it gives me the opportunity to talk to people about what they like and what they desire. It makes my job of bringing people joy easier.”

She added it’s refreshing to get out of her Halifax studio and to enjoy the collegial atmosphere.

For Krissie Worthman, the market will be her first outside of Newfoundland and Labrador.

She said she was excited to showcase her silk-screen art to a new clientele.

“Having my own physical shop isn’t possible so these markets are a great opportunity to talk to people about my work and these small town venues are great because it’s so much more up close and personal. “I think craft, and those markets for vendors, has really taken off.”

The market is scheduled to run from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

joshua.rj.healey@gmail.com

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